One of the reasons why I started GolfThreads was that I have a passion for finding up-and-coming apparel brands. Sure, the big brands have their superstar Tour players, creative marketing agencies and powerful distribution channels, but it is the smaller brands that are constantly challenging the status quo from a technology and style standpoint. One such brand is Redvanly.

The Jersey City start-up was founded in 2013, launched its first collection in Spring 2015, and finds itself well positioned as the golf apparel market becomes more athletic and more casual with every season.

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The Jones Polo

Unlike many start-up labels that are looking to grow at a meteoric pace Redvanly is taking a different and refreshing approach. “As a young company, we have always believed in starting small and growing at the right pace. Slowly, but surely, has been the phrase,” said co-founder Andrew Redvanly in a GolfThreads interview last fall.

This slow and steady philosophy seems to be paying off. Although Redvanly is a young label and small from an employee standpoint, its apparel is stocked in nearly 150 locations across the country. You’ll see Redvanly’s signature lower case cursive ‘r’ in a wide range of shops, such as high-end health clubs (Equinox), luxurious resorts (Hualalai Resort, Tranquilo Four Seasons), upscale daily fee courses (Half Moon Bay Golf Links, Whistling Straits, Sandpiper Golf Club), and top-tier retailers (Trendygolf, New York Golf, Nordstrom). I’d say Redvanly is growing at the right pace, and at the right places.

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The Charlton Polo

Usually, it is easy to put golf apparel brands into various buckets. You have your ultra-techie sneaker brands, your modern fashion forward labels, and your classics. Redvanly, however, is really a mashup of the first two. The looks are clean, the fits are contemporary, and the fabric is as cutting edge as it gets.

A passion for high performance is at the core of what Redvanly is all about and this is evident in its choice of fabric. The unique polyester/Tencel®/elastane blend offers a perfect blend of moisture-wicking, stretch and softness.

SEE ALSO: GETTING TO KNOW REDVANLY

The polyester and Tencel combine to form a yin and yang in moisture management. Polyester is hydrophobic, meaning that it hates water as much as a cat. For that reason, polyester wants to push sweat away, allowing it to evaporate. This sounds great, but if 100% of a shirt is composed of synthetic fibers, it will actually resist moisture when you first begin to sweat. This is where the Tencel fibers play an integral role.

Tencel is a lot like my golf balls – it loves water. Rather than pushing sweat away, it absorbs the moisture to keep you cooler and dryer. In fact, Tencel absorbs 50% more moisture than cotton. Once the Tencel absorbs sweat, the polyester in Redvanly’s fabric blend pushes it away. Think of it as an assembly line for disposing sweat.

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The Leonard Crew

Tencel comes with additional benefits, too. It just happens to be the softest fabric in the world and it drapes incredibly well. The first time you slip on a Redvanly shirt, you’ll swear that it is fabricated from a cotton-blend. (It is so soft that I triple checked the tag and the website to make sure that it didn’t have any cotton in it.)

While nearly every golf apparel brand boasts about their lightweight, moisture-wicking and stretchy technical fabrics, the next frontier in high-performance materials is feel. Until now, golfers have always had to trade softness for performance, but with this innovative blend, Redvanly has created the Holy Grail of technical fabrics. It’s light, breathable, moisture wicking, and soft.

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The Morton Polo

From a style standpoint, Redvanly reflects where golf fashion, and in broader terms, where men’s fashion is heading. The vibe is cool, casual, athletic and understated. Subtle details and bold color blocking are used to elevate the aesthetics of the shirts. The fits are sharp and tailored. Yes, they are slim, but not tight. The sleeves hit perfectly in the mid-bicep area and the length of the shirts is perfect for tucking them in while on the course or leaving them untucked for a more laid back feeling on the street.

Redvanly’s golf collection for 2016 features six polos with a blend of classic and modern looks. I’ve been wearing the Morton, with a split color-blocked collar and contrasting placket and sleeve hems, everywhere. Not only does this polo look, feel and perform great on the course, but it also makes for a great post-workout, summer cookout or just lounging on the couch shirt.

Two of the more eye-catching polos in the collection are the Sullivan and the Charlton. Both are contemporary in style with the Sullivan sporting royal blue color blocking on the chest and sleeves, while the Charlton features contrasting white sleeves against a light purple body.

The Jones and the Leroy, on the other hand, infuse classic details with modern designs. The red placket and collar on the Jones provide a pop of color, while the white hem on the right sleeve of the Leroy provides a modest accent.

If you are looking to keep your style simple, you really can’t go wrong with the clean lines and cool looks of the Prince Polo. The solid colors and clean lines make this an essential for every modern man’s wardrobe.

The versatility of Redvanly’s apparel makes the brand a ‘must-stock’ for country club pro shops and resort shops. Not only can the polos go anywhere and do anything, but Redvanly’s line of t-shirts and shorts can easily find a home at the tennis courts, in the gym, and on the pool deck. The brand’s stylish and high-performance apparel makes it an easy sell to members who are multisport weekend athletes.

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The Vestry Crew

Redvanly’s polos range in price from $87 to $92, t-shirts check in at $72 and shorts are $67. The lightweight Murray Jacket, one of my favorite pieces in the collection, is $155.

Redvanly on the web: Redvanly.com
Redvanly on Facebook: @Redvanly
Redvanly on Instagram: @redvanly

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